No plans for expansion here!

My mum is coming to visit tomorrow, and that means that I’ve spent more than the usual proportion of time on finishing up household projects especially in the railroad room cum office cum guest room*. The cabinets along the back wall of the room were among those projects, and I’m rather pleased with how they’ve turned out.    The bulk of the cabinets were from … Continue reading No plans for expansion here!

Who put all that stuff in the TRAIN room?

On Wednesday, I took a reprieve from working in the evening (which is how I’ve spent most of January) to take in a work session chez my friend Scott Calvert. He indicated I should bring my soldering iron. When I went to retrieve it, I found an impassible pile of detritus in front of my desk. The soldering iron was virtually buried. I texted a photo to … Continue reading Who put all that stuff in the TRAIN room?

A note to whoever uninstalls Pembroke

Dear future self; One day when you go to take Pembroke out, the north section can be removed with just the screws into the wall and the cabinets.  They’re all accessible from beneath.  All except this one screw at the end of the Pembroke Milling Company siding, which goes straight into the windowsill.  You’ll probably find it completely buried in ballast. The southern section has three … Continue reading A note to whoever uninstalls Pembroke

The Basket Case of Pembroke Hill

Of course the vertical transition curve at the top of the hill in Pembroke had to include a turnout.  So I wasn’t surprised when the dust settled after the Battle of Pembroke Hill to find that removing this transition had transformed the turnout into a bit of a basket case.  I was, however, surprised by how much rail needed to be removed – about three … Continue reading The Basket Case of Pembroke Hill

The Battle of Pembroke Hill

Well, I won’t say it was easy, but I believe I’ve managed to get the roadbed pretty flat through the north end of Pembroke.  As I mentioned, the roadbed was glued and screwed (from above) onto the benchwork, and the screws particularly made the work tough.  I also found that the contortions I had to undergo to work above my workbench were severe (though not … Continue reading The Battle of Pembroke Hill